Teknofiloen albistegia
7

Wall Street Journal: argitaraturiko erantzun gutunak

Erabiltzailearen aurpegia
Juan Martin Elexpuru - Vancouver
2007-11-21 : 09:11

Juan Martin Elexpuru naiz, Vancouverren nago ingelesa ikastera etorrita. Joan den ostiralean, kasualitatez, polemikari jarraipena ematen dioten hainbat gutun sorta aurkitu nituen Wall Street Journal egunkarian. Kopiatu egin ditut eta hor doazkizue. Ondo izan. Eguneraketa, 12.25: Erantzunetan, 180 lagunek WSJra bidali duten gutuna osorik, sinadura guztiekin.

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL - Friday, november 16, 2007 - LETTERS TO DIRECTOR

Euskera, the Very ancient basque Language, Struggles for Respect

I suppose you thought you were quite clever by using the word “inquisitions” (Basque inquisition: (“How do you say shepherd in Euskera”), page one, nov. 6), which almost everyone associates with the bloody rampage of medieval Spain to rid the Iberian Peninsula of Muslims, Jews and other undesirables. The implication is that Basque are attempting some form of ethnic cleansing through their linguistic policies. This ideas is furthered by the subtitle “Trough Fiat Basques Bring old tongue to Life.” Te word fiat means an authoritative decree of order such as real fiat. However, the Policies which the members of the far (no center) right Partido Popular are so offended have been created in a democratically elected parliament and supported by the Spanish Constitution, which protects the promotion and use of Euskera as a co-official language of the Basque Country.

I’m not sure why it’s so hard to understand that after living trough the repression of a violent dictatorship, a people would want to reclaim their cultural identity and promote what was taken away from by Francoists though fiat.

Kristen Mongoven
Brooklyn, N.Y.

----

The Basque Language may not thrive, but is silly for any objector to say that one of euskera’s flaws is its lack of native words for things such as airports or independence or democracy. Guess what? If English had no words for these things except from Anglo-Saxon (Germanic) roots, we’d be jetting into “flyhavens” and celebrating the signing of our Declaration of “Unhangingdownship” as one of the written bases of our American “folkmightiness.” Neologisms from Greek and Latin populate most European languages. Why not Basque after 700 years o more?

J.D. Noonan
Assoc Professor of Classics
University of South Florida
Tampa, Fla.

---------------

Finally, someone from a prestigious international newspaper covers in detail the tragedy going on the Basque Country (and in Catalonia), and doesn’t address the problem as an exotic regional fact. I think you’ve been very precise and extremely brave in describing the situation. I have not doubt that you are being flooded by nasty messages from Basque Nationalists who, as inquisitors, take as a sin against God any criticisms made against their regime. However, millions of people, including non-nationalistic Basques or those of Basque descent, such as myself, are extremely thankful to you for your analysis and your courage.

José Yanguas
Madrid

----------------

At age five I went to school as a unilingual Basque, and on the first day I was told that I couldn’t speak any more word of it. If I did, I would have t pay a fine, which I did, more than once. The books that I was given to study didn’t mention the word Basque We didn’t exist. We only learned about Spain, which was mostly Madrid and Castile and the Spanish Empire. Though was the worst offender, he didn’t initiates the anti-Basque Policies. Already in the 16th Century a Castilian king was requesting that the Basque conduct their government affairs in Castilian and that those who spoke only Basque should not be able to hold offices. For centuries the civilized kingdom nation of Europe enforced repressive linguistic policies toward minorities. So much for liberté, egalité and fraternité, right? They haven’t apologized yes, But I’m waiting.

Linguists all over the world marvel at antiquity of Euskera and its potential to unlock many past secrets, but the governments of France and Spain would gladly bury it. They don’t considerer it a part of their national patrimony, and the repression continues this day.

Joxe Mallea-Olaetxe
Reno, Nev.

-------------

The Basques who are who are trying to expand of use of their language should be realize that there are better ways of expressing national pride than by language. Some of my brethren in Cornwall are trying to revive the Cornish language, dead for over 200 years. What a waste of time. Both the Basques and the Cornish have emigrated widely, spreading their special skills and initiatives. For that they should be proud. I am.

Rodney Angove
Mountain View, Calif.

-----------

Let’s reconcile and resolve all these issues in a very democratic way, by adding another word rooted in Latin, “self-determination”, which is defined as the firm right of the people to decide how dependent or not they want to be. Madrid never aloe this for the obvious reason that the Basques will use democracy to demonstrate their unalienable right to determine their own destiny.

Steve Mendive
Boise, Idaho

Erantzunak

Sustatu
2007-11-21 : 10:13

Erantzun pilatuen erreferentzia ageri da bilaketa eginez WSJ-ren sareko bertsioan, baina testu hauek eskuratzeko ordaindu egin behar da: eskerrik asko, beraz, Juan Martin, gutunak hona ekartzeagatik.


Bestalde, 180 lagunek (unibertsitateko irakasleak gehienak) beste gutun bat idatzi diot Wall Street Journal-eko zuzendaritzari, lehen orrian atera dezaten eskatuz. Horra albistea eta gutuna PDF formatuan. Tamalez, norbaiti bururatu zaio PDF horren testua kopiarako babestea, eta ezin dugu erreproduzitu hemen.


Azkenik, WSJ-k beste zuzenketa bat ere argitaratu zuen azaroaren 15ean:


STUDENTS ENTERING public school in the Basque region of Spain in the next academic year will be taught primarily, though not exclusively, in Euskera, the Basque language, if the Basque regional parliament approves a law drafted by the regional government. Under the law, it would no longer be possible for new students to pursue a wholly Spanish-language course of study in public schools in the Basque Country. A Nov. 6 page-one article about the language failed to note that the plan requires approval of the regional parliament, and incorrectly said that classes would be taught only in Basque.


Sustatu
2007-11-21 : 13:21

Profesional mordoak sinatutako PDF enkriptatuaren kasu absurdoa Zabaldu.com-en ere azaldu da. eta hango irakurle bati esker, testu osoa berreskuratzea posible izan da. Mila esker, BlakPast. Jarrain, testu osoa eta erantzunak.


Sunday, November 18, 2007


Dear friends from the Wall Street Journal,


Please accept this article written, approved and signed by 180 individuals, representing
twenty different institutions, media, and universities in eight countries. We are scholars,
researchers, writers, librarians and professionals whose paramount objective is to correct
the misinformation and inaccuracies of the Keith Johnson article regarding the Basque
language. Among us, there are specialists in linguistic legislation, sociolinguistics,
minority languages and endangered languages. We also represent different aspects of
science, from nuclear physics to cellular biology and we conduct our investigations and
publish our research in Basque among other languages. One eminent politician is
included in the list, Pete T. Cenarrusa, former Secretary of State of Idaho (1967-2003) for
the Republican Party. Mr. Johnson’s piece has ignited an international network of
specialists that believe a resolute and official retraction is appropriate and required from
the Wall Street Journal out of respect to its readers and minority peoples around the
world.


We would suggest a supplementary follow-up article, based on facts and data which we
would be more than happy to facilitate from the European Union, the EBLUL, the United
Nations, the EUSTAT and numerous scholarly research projects conducted in the Basque
territories and those with minority language users around the world. Our attached
statement gives an indication of the gross errors introduced into the minds of your readers
when Mr. Johnson’s article was given front page status. The corrections and
amplifications of November 7, 8 and 15 included in the online version of the WSJ are not
sufficient; nor the article “Euskera, the Very Ancient Basque Language, Struggles for
Respect”, published on November 16. Indeed, the readers are the ones that deserve
respect. We would hope that our statement or another article be published also on the
front page, demonstrating that corrections are given equal importance to previously
published erroneous and misrepresentative stories. The WSJ must maintain its reputation
of international excellence and serve as an example of responsibility, dependability and
accuracy in journalism.


We are making a public request to you. This letter and your response to it will be
published in several American and international academic journals, in the Basque,
Catalan and other presses, and for many years to come in the future research conducted in
sociolinguistics and endangered group identity issues. We are certain the WSJ will accept
the obligation to correct itself and we look forward to collaborating and being a part of a
solution by writing a new guest article for you, or assisting Mr. Johnson in writing a
follow-up piece.


We look forward to your response and a discussion of possibilities for a positive
outcome.


Sincerely,


The Basque Language among other world wide endangered languages


Having read the article entitled “Basque Inquisition: How Do You Say Shepherd in
Euskera? Through Fiat, Separatists Bring Old Tongue to Life…” published on November
6, we enclose an answer based on the facts and the laws of the Basque Country, since it
seems that the author of the article has based it on only one biased testimony without any
further research and without a minimum knowledge of the facts.


Let’s start with the map; the article includes a really “original” map of the Basque
Country according to which the Basque Country is about 550 miles (880 kilometers)
wide. Without looking any further than Google, you will find out that the Basque
Country is not even 100 miles wide.


Now to focus on the main idea of the article: Mrs. Esquivias, a math teacher at a school in
the Basque Country, is going to be dismissed from her job if she does not learn Basque.
This is simply false.


The Spanish constitution states in its preamble that it will protect all Spaniards and
peoples of Spain in the exercise of human rights, of their culture and traditions,
languages and institutions.
Article 3 states as well that:


  1. Castilian is the official Spanish language of the State. All Spaniards have the duty
    to know it and the right to use it.

  2. The other Spanish languages shall also be official in the respective Self-governing
    Communities in accordance with their Statutes.

  3. The richness of the different linguistic modalities of Spain is a cultural heritage
    which shall be specially respected and protected.


According to Spanish law, every Spanish citizen has the right and the duty to know
Spanish and only the right to know Basque, Catalan or other official languages of the
Spanish state.


In virtue of this constitutional rule and according to the Law 10/1982 of November 24, on
the normalization of the Basque language (article 14.2), the authorities will determine the
places for which it is prescriptive to know both languages
(Spanish and Basque). That is
to say, there are certain positions for which it would be compulsory to know “both
languages” (Basque and Spanish). An example of these positions is “Basque language
teacher,” for which, as everyone will understand, it is compulsory to know Basque. The
law 10/1982 was reviewed and approved by the Spanish Constitutional Court, the
institution in charge of examining the adaptation of the laws to the Constitution. (Anyone
can search the resolution 82/1986, on June 26, by the constitutional court on the internet,
available only in Spanish).


The law that determines the use of both languages (Spanish and Basque) at any public job
in the Basque Autonomous Community (BAC) is the Basque Civil Service Law, la Ley de
Función Pública Vasca 6/1989, of June 6, according to which each one of the positions in
the Basque administration will have a “Linguistic Profile” (LP). Based on the
requirements of the job, it will be necessary or not for the person applyingfor the position
to know Basque, but it will always be compulsory to know Spanish, for it is a
constitutional requirement (article 3.1). By virtue of the requirements for each job, there
are four different LPs: LP1, LP2, LP3 and LP4 (LP1 being “no knowledge of Basque”
and LP4 being “full knowledge of Basque”). Each public job at the BAC has been
assigned an LP. It could happen that according to the requirements of the job, the
requisite linguistic profile may change from LP1 to LP2. in such a case the public officer
may either increase their proficiency in Basque or be transferred to another position in
which he/she maintains his/her LP. However, he/she would never lose his/her job.
Another serious error in Johnson’s article.


There are two fields of the BAC administration that are out of the LP system: health care
and law enforcement (police). In neither case is it required to know Basque or to have a
basic LP in Basque.


In the specific case of Mrs. Esquivias (education) there are only two existing LPs: LP1
(only Spanish is required) and LP2 (Spanish and Basque are required). In this specific
case LP2 is required when the class has to be taught in Basque (Basque language or any
other subject to be taught in Basque). The law that regulates the LPs in education is the
Decree 47/1993, of March 9, and anyone can find it in the internet


The problem Mrs. Esquivias has is not that she is going to be removed from her job if she
does not learn Basque (This is as false as it is illegal), but that she is running out of
students. Most of the students are taking math in Basque. In other words, more and more
students are electing to have math taught in Basque and not in Spanish, so there is a need
for Basque-speaking math teachers. However, according to the law, Mrs. Esquivias
cannot be removed from her job for not learning Basque.


Indeed, she has the opportunity to take a two year sabbatical, with full salary, in order to
learn Basque. She has elected to do so, not because it has been imposed to her (which
would be illegal under Spanish law), but because she has elected to do so. To suggest
otherwise should be considered an exaggeration or a plain lie.


Moreover, the author should have added that the Basque language is completely banned
in public administration (including, naturally education) in the southern part of the
Historical Community of Navarre (HCN), more precisely in the area named the “non-
Basque speaking zone.” The author should have mentioned that in the Basque territories
of the French state (Pays basque) the Basque language is not official at all.


However, apart from the main point of the article, which is that "Basque inquisitors are
abolishing the right of citizenship to speak Spanish," which, in our opinion, can only be
said from a complete ignorance of the rule of law or with a clear political bias, the article
makes comments on several linguistic or sociolinguistic principles that have to be
clarified.


The author of the article states that only 630,000 people speak Basque while 450 million
speak Spanish. We can be certain that the author does not mean by that that it is not
worth it to speak or to learn Basque… For, according to that line of reasoning, we all
should be speaking Chinese or Portuguese, or maybe English. However, again, the data
are quite inexact perhaps because, even if the author does not cite the source of
information being used, data as old as that of 1996 has been used to write the article. In
any case, in 1996, the Basque Country had nearly 3,000,000 inhabitants (accurately
2,098,055 of them living at the BAC) and according to the official statistics in 1996, 60%
of the population in the BAC had an average or good mastery of Basque (far from the
30% expressed in the article). The statistics by Eustat and other agencies are available on
the internet. No further research was necessary in order to have accurate data for 2007:
http://www.eustat.es/indice.asp?idioma=i and almost everything is available in English. There is no excuse not to know. Statements such as “Euskera just isn’t used in real life”
are quite an exaggeration or simply a lack of knowledge of contemporary reality.


From the point of view of the history of language (concretely history of semantics) the
statement expressing that words such as “Airport, science, Renaissance, democracy,
government, and independence,” are all newly minted words with no roots in traditional
Basque, is certainly curious. Clearly, the author does not know Basque, for he does not
know that “Renaissance” is “Berpizkunde” in Basque, or “govern” is “jaurlaritza” or
“independence” is “askatasuna.” As for the rest of his examples, it is noteworthy that
“airport” is “aeropuerto” in Spanish, “aéroport” in French, “aeroporto” in Italian,
“aeroporto” in Portuguese… and so on. “Democracy” is “democracia” in Spanish,
“démocratie” in French, “demokratie” in German, “democrazia” in Italian, “democracia”
in Portuguese… and so on. But, is not that the beauty of language? Is not it delightful to
have words like “democracy” or “telephone” or “penicillin” constructed with ancient
Latin and Greek roots? Over the centuries, languages have given words to each others
and the author may not know that Spanish words such as “bizarro” (bizarre in English),
“izquierda” (left), “chalupa” (boat), “escarcha” (frost), “landa” (field), “mozo” (guy),
“sidra” (cider), “silueta” (silhouette) or “zoquete” (silly), among some 200 others, are of
Basque origin. Should not communication among languages and cultures be celebrated?
Should not human civilization promote the exchange of knowledge instead of defending
isolationism? We are sure that more than one specialist in semantics would answer
affirmatively.


It is simply sad to hear Basque referred to as “an ancient language little suited to
contemporary life…”. We lament knowing that there are still people defending the idea
that there are classes among languages; that some languages are fossils that no longer
evolve. Everything evolves in life; we are sure that all Basque people who work in
schools, Basque writers who have had their original Basque novels translated into more
than 30 languages (Atxaga…), Basque engineers working at technology industries
(Mondragon, CAF…), people working at the edge of technology in the Aeronautic
industry (Aernnova, ITP, Sener, MTorres…) or even developing revolutionary scientific
theories in Basque (Etxenike…) would take issue with Mr. Johnson’s statement.
Moreover, people living in Basque every single day of their lives may think it erroneous
to state that to say “I love you” in ancient Basque is no longer “suitable.” But we all
know who Leopoldo Barreda is (not Barrera as it appears in the article, another error) and
what political party he works for.


We hope that the author of the article has read, one by one, Basque textbooks before
formulating the accusation that “Basque-language textbooks used in schools never tell
students that the Basque Country is part of Spain.” And, if he has, we suggest he should
do it again. He may find himself quite wrong.


Also, the author should review a few books and archives on Basque history, as the
statement “Basque separatists have been waging a struggle for independence from Spain
for 39 years…” appears to be some 200 years off. In fact, the government of Gipuzkoa
asked for independence in 1793, almost 214 years ago, more accurately the claim for
independence in the Basque country is as old as the Spanish and the French states. Just
another error.


We are sure that the Wall Street Journal demands accuracy, seriousness and
responsibility from its collaborators because the raison d'être of an article is to inform
and to provide precise, correct and exact data. We hope that the errors of this politically
biased article will be corrected.


Signatures


  1. Teresa Boucher, Chair, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Boise
    State University.

  2. Fátima María Cornwall, Spanish Language Coordinator, Modern Languages &
    Literatures Department, Boise State University.

  3. Iñigo Urrutia, Vice Dean, Faculty of Economy and Professor of Administrative Law,
    Department of Constitutional Law, Administrative Law and Philosophy of Law,
    Faculty of Economy, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country, Leioa.

  4. Nekane Balluerka, Vice Dean, Faculty of Psychology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  5. Robert Clark, Professor Emeritus of International Relations, George Mason
    University, Washington DC.

  6. Iñaki Zabaleta Urkiola, Chair, Theory, Technique and Technology of Audio-visual
    Media, Department of Journalism, Faculty of Social Sciences and Communication,
    Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  7. Bernardo Atxaga, Idazle / Writer, Distinguished Scholar at the University of Nevada,
    Reno.

  8. Pedro Ibarra, Chair, Department of Political Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and
    Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Leioa.

  9. Pello Salaburu, Chair, Basque Philology, Department of Basque Language, Faculty of
    Social Sciences and Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of
    the Basque Country.

  10. Miren Cajaraville, Chair, Cell Biology, Department of Zoology and Animal Cell
    Biology, Faculty of Science & Technology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country.

  11. José Manuel Castells, Chair, Administrative Law, Faculty of Law, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  12. José Ángel Ascunce Arrieta, Professor of Spanish Culture, Deustuko Unibertsitatea /
    University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  13. Laura Mintegi, President of the PEN Club Basque Country, Professor at the
    Department of Didactic of the Language and Literature, University Teaching School
    of Gasteiz / Gasteizko Irakasleen Unibertsitate Eskola, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
    / University of the Basque Country, Gasteiz/Vitoria.

  14. Rafael Pla López, Professor of Mathematics, Universitat de València / University of
    Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

  15. Javier Maestro, Professor of Social Movements and Political Thought, Department of
    History of the Social Communication, Faculty of Information Sciences, Universidad
    Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain.

  16. Maria Cenicacelaya, Professor of Constitutional Law at the Universidad Nacional del
    Noroeste de Buenos Aires (UNNOBA) and at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata
    (UNLP), Argentina.

  17. Jose Antonio Aspiazu, Oñati International Institute for the Sociology of Law (IISL),
    Oñati, Gipuzkoa.

  18. Steven Gamboa, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy and
    Religious Studies, California State University, Bakersfield.

  19. José Idoyaga Arrospide, Chair, Department of Audio-Visual Communication and
    Publicity, Faculty of Social Sciences and Communication, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  20. Joseba Zuazo, Former Dean of the Faculty of Philology, Geography and History,
    Professor at the Department of Medieval and Modern American History, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  21. Pilar Vicente Imaz, Director of San Fermin Ikastola, Zizur Txikia, Nafarroa.

  22. Juan Madariaga Orbea, Professor of Contemporary History, Nafarroako Unibertsitate
    Publikoa / State University of Navarre, Iruñea/Pamplona.

  23. Julia Ibarra Murillo, Professor at the Department of Pedagogy & Psychology,
    Nafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa / State University of Navarre, Iruñea/Pamplona.

  24. Nagore Iñurrategi Irizar, Professor at the Department of Teaching Processes /
    Hezkuntza Prozesuak Departamendua, Faculty of Humanities and Teaching,
    Mondragon Unibertsitatea / University of Mondragon, Eskoriatza.

  25. Itziar Idiazabal, Professor at the Department of Linguistics and Basque Studies,
    Faculty of Philology and Geography and History, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Gasteiz/Vitoria.

  26. Andrés Zamudio, PhD Lecturer at the Department of Philosophy and Social Sciences,
    ITESO (Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente), Universidad
    Jesuita de Guadalajara / Jesuit University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico.

  27. Jon Sarasua, Director of Lanki Ikertegia / Institute of Co-operative Research,
    Mondragon Unibertsitatea / University of Mondragon, Gizpuzkoa.

  28. Baleren Bakaikoa, Director of the University Institute, Department of Economy,
    Faculty of Law, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  29. Jose Ramon Bengoetxea, Professor of Legal Theory, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  30. Carmen Peñafiel Saiz, Director of the Department of Journalism, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  31. LaVona Andrew, Interpreter Manager/Trainer, Video Remote Interpreting Adjunct
    Faculty, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Boise State University.

  32. Xoxe Estévez, Professor of History, Deustuko Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto,
    Donostia/San Sebastián.

  33. María Eugenia Cruset, Professor of History and Magister of International relations,
    Universidad Nacional de La Plata (La Plata, Argentina) and Universidad Católica de
    La Plata, La Plata, Argentina.

  34. Jesus Razkin, Professor of the Chemistry Department, Nafarroako Unibertsitate
    Publikoa / State University of Navarre, Iruña/Pamplona.

  35. Maite López Flamarique, Professor at the Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de
    México, Mexico.

  36. Gurutze Ezkurdia Arteaga, Director of the Department of Basque Language at the
    Campus of Bizkaia, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country, Bilbo.

  37. Nestor Garay-Vitoria, PhD Student, Linguistic Predictive Systems. Application to
    languages with high and low degree of flexion, in the field of Alternative
    Communication, Laboratorio de Interacción Persona-Computador para Necesidades
    Especiales (LIPCNE), Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country.

  38. Leyre Arrieta Alberdi, Professor of History of the Basque Country, Deustuko
    Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  39. Iñaki Beti Sáez, Professor of Labor Psychology in Humanities, Deustuko
    Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  40. Isabel Recalde Delgado, Professor of French Language and Literature, Deustuko
    Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  41. Maite Sagasti Goikoetxea, Head of the Master on European Culture, Deustuko
    Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  42. María Luisa San Miguel Casillas, Professor of Contemporary History and Modern
    Literature, Deustuko Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  43. Jon Gurutz Olaskoaga, Professor at the Department of Business Management, E.U.E.
    Empresariales, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Bilbo.

  44. Egoitz Sierra Uria, Professor at the Department of Graphic Expression & Engineering
    Projects, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  45. Mikel Aizpuru, Secretary of the Department of Contemporary History, University
    School of Labor Relations, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country.

  46. Enrike G. Argandoña, Professor of Anatomy, Department of Nursery, Faculty of
    Nursery, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Leioa.

  47. Jon Nazabal, Polymer Science & Technology Department and Institute for Polymer
    Materials “POLYMAT”, Chemistry Faculty, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  48. Mario Zubiaga Garate, Professor at the Department of Political Science, Faculty of
    Social Sciences and Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of
    the Basque Country, Leioa.

  49. Alicia Garza, Professor of Spanish Language and Literature, Modern Languages and
    Literatures Department, Boise State University.

  50. Bingen Ametzaga Iribarren, Director of the Department of Cardiology at the Hospital
    Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela.

  51. Jesus L. Garay Hinojal, Professor at the Department of Didactic of the Languages and
    Literatures, University Teaching School of Gasteiz / Gasteizko Irakasleen
    Unibertsitate Eskola, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country, Gasteiz/Vitoria.

  52. Mertxe de Renobales Scheifler, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  53. Gorka Aulestia, Professor of Literature at the Aulas de la Experiencia, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  54. Paulo Iztueta, Retired Professor of History and Sociology of the Language, Faculty of
    Pedagogy, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Donostia/San Sebastián.

  55. Iñaki Lasagabaster Herrarte, Professor of Administrative Law, Department of
    Constitutional Law, Administrative Law and Philosophy of Law, Faculty of
    Economy, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  56. Jason Herbeck, French Section Head, Modern Languages and Literatures Department,
    at Boise State University.

  57. Nina M. Ray, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing and International Business, Boise State
    University.

  58. Joseba Zulaika, Professor, Center for Basque Studies, University of Nevada, Reno.

  59. Cristina Gutierrez-Canas Mateo, Professor at the Department of Chemical and
    Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Bilbo.

  60. Óscar Álvarez Gila, Professor of History of America, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Gasteiz/Vitoria.

  61. Beret Norman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German, Modern Languages &
    Literatures Department, Boise State University.

  62. Xabier Olaizola, Retired Professor of Cost Accounting, Financial Accounting and
    Analytical Accounting, Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  63. Joseba M. González Ardeo, Professor at the Department of English and German
    Philology, Translation and Interpretation, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University
    of the Basque Country.

  64. Miren Artiach, Chair Member of the Cenarrusa Foundation for Basque Culture
    Board, Boise (Idaho).

  65. Ramón Zabala Agirre, Professor of Spanish Language and Literature at the Leizaran
    Institute, Andoain.

  66. Santi Urrutia, Professor of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences and
    Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  67. Pedro Peña, English Teacher at the Azpeitia Institute, Azpeitia, Gipuzkoa.

  68. Ibon Cancio Uriarte, Lecturer of Cell Biology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country.

  69. Juan Manuel Egia, Director of Information Systems / Informazio-Sistemen
    Zuzendaria, Lagun Aro Insurances / Lagun Aro Aseguruak, Basque Country.

  70. Idoia Marcellán Baraze, Professor at the Department of Didactic of Music, Art and
    Body Expression / Musika, Plastika eta Gorputz adierazpenaren didaktika saila,
    Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  71. Mikel Begiristain, Engineer, Construcciones y Auxiliares de Ferrocarriles (CAF),
    Beasain, Gipuzkoa.

  72. Alberto Lusarreta, Engineer, Torres de Elortz Corporation, Elortz, Navarre.

  73. Alberto Irigoyen Artetxe, Novelist and Essayist, Montevideo, Uruguay.

  74. Miren Itxaso Sanchez Morales, Professor of Administrative Law, Department of
    Constitutional Law, Administrative Law and Philosophy of Law, Faculty of
    Economy, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  75. Agurtzane Goiriena, Professor of Philosophy of Law, Department of Constitutional
    Law, Administrative Law and Philosophy of Law, Faculty of Economy, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  76. Mikel Zurbano Irizar, Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  77. Patxi Juaristi Larrinaga, Professor of Politic Sciences, Politic and Administrative
    Sciences Department, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country.

  78. Adela Colera Herrero, Professor of Spanish Language and Linguistics, Deustuko
    Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  79. Maite Garrues Saralegi, Secretary of the Liberal Arts Faculty, Deustuko
    Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  80. Eider Landaberea Abad, Professor of Contemporary History, Deustuko Unibertsitatea
    / University of Deusto, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  81. José Luis Orella Unzué, Retired Professor of History and Head of the Ignacio de
    Loyola Chair, Deustuko Unibertsitatea / University of Deusto, Donostia/San
    Sebastián.

  82. Xabier Iriondo Arana, Lawyer, Internal Affairs Department, Basque Autonomous
    Community’s Administration.

  83. Enrique Poittevin Gilmet, Member of Haize Hegoa Institution, Montevideo, Uruguay.

  84. Miren Aintzane Saralegui Bastarrica, Member of Haize Hegoa Institution,
    Montevideo, Uruguay.

  85. Xabier Ezeizabarrena, Ph.D., Lawyer, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of
    the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  86. Luis Del Portillo Valdés, Technical Engineering School of Bilbo / Bilboko
    Ingeniaritza Goi Eskola Teknikoa, Machines and Thermic Engines Department /
    Makina eta Motor Termikoen Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the
    Basque Country, Bilbo.

  87. Xabier Ostolaza, Professor at the Department of System Engineering & Control,
    Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San
    Sebastián.

  88. Susin Cano, Member of the Arturo Campion Research Institute, Buenos Aires,
    Argentina.

  89. José Francisco Domingo Ormaetxea, Member of the Arturo Campion Research
    Institute, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  90. Patxi Azparren Olaizola professor of Basque Language and Anthropologist,
    Donostia/San Sebastián.

  91. Mari Jose Olaziregi, Professor (UNR / EHU-UPV).

  92. Maren Ortiz Zarragoitia, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology,
    Department of Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Science and Technology, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  93. Gorka Iturriaga Madariaga, Professor at the Faculty of Physical Sciences and
    Activities, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  94. Maitane Arnoso, Professor at the Department of Political Science, Faculty of Social
    Sciences and Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the
    Basque Country, Leioa.

  95. Nora Olano Gurrutxaga, Galtzaundi Euskara Taldeko euskara teknikaria, Tolosa,
    Gipuzkoa.

  96. Nahia Zarzosa Aizpurua, Translator (into English, Basque and Spanish), Lekeitioko
    Udala, City Council of Lekeitio, Bizkaia.

  97. Iratxe Ibarra, Bertsolaria / Singing-Poet, Markina-Xemein, Bizkaia.

  98. Igor Elortza Aranoa, Bertsolaria / Singing-Poet, Durango, Bizkaia.

  99. Xebastian Lizaso Iraola, Bertsolaria / Singing-Poet, Azpeitia, Gizpuzkoa.

  100. Arantzazu Ametzaga, Liburuzain eta Idazle / Librarian & Writer, Altzuza,
    Nafarroa.

  101. Nere Erkiaga, Liburuzain / Librarian, Xenpelar Dokumentazio Zentroa / Xenpelar
    Documentation Center, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  102. Naiara Amezua Valera, Liburuzain / Librarian, Mondragoneko Unibertsitatea,
    University of Mondragon, Gipuzkoa.

  103. Inaki Irazabalbeitia, Ph.D., Idazle / Writer, Donostia, Gizpuzkoa.

  104. Iratxe Gonzalez Vazquez, EITB24.com-eko Itzultzaile / Translator at
    EITB24.com, Bilbo, Bizkaia.

  105. Iñaki Aurrekoetxea Arkotxa, Irakasle / Teacher, Gernika-Lumo Institute, Gernika
    Lumo, Bizkaia.

  106. Manu Soto, Professor, Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of
    Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Science and Technology, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  107. Maite Garmendia Galarregui, Professor at the Department of Didactic of the
    Language and Literature, University Teaching School of Gasteiz / Gasteizko
    Irakasleen Unibertsitate Eskola, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the
    Basque Country, Gasteiz/Vitoria.

  108. Itxaso Astigarraga, Secreatry of BAKUN Itzulpen eta Argitalpen Zerbitzuak,
    Translation Corporation, Arroa, Gipuzkoa.

  109. Nerea Alberdi, BAKUN Itzulpen eta Argitalpen Zerbitzuak, Translation
    Corporation, Arroa, Gipuzkoa.

  110. Amaia Andrieu, Professor of Didactic of the Plastic Expression, University
    Teaching School of Gasteiz / Gasteizko Irakasleen Unibertsitate Eskola, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Gasteiz/Vitoria.

  111. Izaskun Kortazar, Spanish Special Lecturer, Modern Languages and Literature
    Department, at Boise State University.

  112. Iñaki Mendiguren Bereziartu, Idazle eta itzultzaile / Writer & Translator, Ezkio-
    Itsaso, Gipuzkoa.

  113. Carmelo Aguirre, Pharmacologist, School of Medicine, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Bilbo.

  114. Eneritz Pagalday, Professor at the Faculty of Humanities and Education of
    Mondragon (HUHEZI), Mondragon Unibertsitatea / University of Mondragon,
    Eskoriatza, Gipuzkoa.

  115. Zesar Martinez, Professor of Sociology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Leioa.

  116. Sarah J. Turtle (ingeles euskaldundua), Irakasle eta itzultzaile / Teacher &
    Translator, Ezkio-Itsaso, Gipuzkoa.

  117. Josu Iztueta, WW Traveler / Bidaiaria, Tolosa, Gipuzkoa.

  118. Migel Mari Elosegi Irurtia, Idazle / Writer, Tolosa, Gipuzkoa.

  119. Mirentxu Ametzaga Clark, Idazle / Writer, Burke, Virginia.

  120. Joxean Amundarain Iturrioz, Member of the Office for Linguistic Normalization /
    Hizkuntza Normalizazioko Teknikaria, Gipuzkoako Foru Aldundia / Government of
    Gipuzkoa, Gipuzkoa.

  121. Eneko Larrañaga Arrizabalaga, Member of Zestoako Bai Euskarari, Zestoa,
    Gizpuzkoa.

  122. Estepan Plazaola Otadui, Euskara teknikaria, Bergara, Gipuzkoa.

  123. Anselmo Vega Vega, Teacher at Angiozarko Eskola, Bergara, Gipuzkoa.

  124. Anaje Narbaiza Aldai, Idazle / Writer, Bergara, Gipuzkoa.

  125. Estibalitz Ezkerra, Basque Library, University of Nevada, Reno.

  126. Ana I. Morales, Translator at the United Nations, New York.

  127. Nestor Etxebarria, Professor at the Department of Analytical Chemistry, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  128. Luis Pedro Gutiérrez Cuenca, Professor at the Department of Music, Art and
    Body Expression, Donostiako Irakasleen Unibertsitate Eskola, Donostia/San
    Sebastián.

  129. Margari León Guereño, Professor at the Donostiako Irakasleen Unibertsitate
    Eskolako Irakaslea, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  130. Kerman Orbegozo Uribe, Head of Staff General Resources, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  131. Josu Rekalde Atela, Quality, Security & Environment Manager, European
    Foundation for Quality Managing, Basque Country.

  132. Neskutz Erkiaga Laka, Secretary of Asti-Leku Ikastola, Portugalete, Bizkaia.

  133. Goio Etxebarria Kerexeta, Professor of Economy, Faculty of Social Sciences and
    Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Leioa.

  134. Igor Ahedo, Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science,
    Faculty of Social Sciences and Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country, Leioa.

  135. Zelai Nikolas Ezkurdia, Lawyer, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  136. Diego Mina Orue, Morgan Stanley, Individual Investors Group / Gestor de
    Patrimonios, Iruñea/Pamplona.

  137. Pello Irujo, The Thomson Corporation, Zizur Txikia. Nafarroa.

  138. Gloria Totoricagüena Egurrola, Ph.D., Basque Global Initiatives, Reno.

  139. Joseba Felix Tobar-Arbulu, Professor of History of Science, School of History,
    Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  140. Patxi Aio Cuesta, Miami University of Oxford, Oxford, USA.

  141. Maite Alvarado, Professor of Mathematic, Department of Mathematics, School of
    Engineering, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Bilbo.

  142. Mikel M. Karrera Egialde, Professor of Civil Law, Faculty of Law, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  143. Antton Olano Irurtia, Itzultzaile / Translator into Basque, Basque Country.

  144. Mikel Gaztelumendi, Polymer Science & Technology Department and Institute
    for Polymer Materials “POLYMAT”, Chemistry Faculty, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  145. Gorka Bueno, Professor of Engineering at the Department of Telecommunication
    and Electronics, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  146. Mari Camen Gil Fombellida, Chair Member of Hamaika Bide Elkartea,
    Donostia/San Sebastián.

  147. Ane Larrinaga, Professor of Sociology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University
    of the Basque Country, Bilbo.

  148. Argitxu Camus, Center for Basque Studies, University of Nevada, Reno.

  149. Mariann Vazci, Center for Basque Studies, University of Nevada, Reno.

  150. César Arrondo, Professor of Contemporary History, Universidad Nacional de La
    Plata (UNLP), La Plata, Argentina.

  151. Arantza Gutierrez Paz, Professor at the Department of Audio-Visual
    Communication and Publicity, Faculty of Social Sciences and Communication,
    Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  152. Joxe Mallea-Olaetxe, Historian, University of Nevada, Reno.

  153. Leandro Etchichury, Anthropologist, Faculty of Philosophy, Universidad de
    Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina.

  154. José M. Rivadeneyra, Professor at the Faculty of Computing Science, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  155. Patxi Sansinenea, Professor of Base Psychology Processes and its Development,
    Faculty of Psychology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  156. Igor Filibi Lopez, Department of Political Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and
    Communication, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Leioa.

  157. Clara Galdos Irazabal, Professor of Mathematics at the Bilboko Magisterio
    Eskola, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Bilbo.

  158. Eduardo Torry, Professor of Political Science, Universidad de Buenos Aires
    (UBA), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  159. Antxon Mendizabal, Professor at the Department of Social Sciences, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Leioa.

  160. Jabier Puldain, Professor of Architecture at the Donostiako Arkitektura Goi
    Eskola Teknikoa, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Donostia/San Sebastián.

  161. Alejandro Simonoff Roa, Ph.D, Professor of International Relations, Universidad
    Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), La Plata, Argentina.

  162. Uri Ruiz Bikandi, Professor at the Department of Didactic of the Languages and
    Literature, University Teaching School of Gasteiz / Gasteizko Irakasleen
    Unibertsitate Eskola, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country, Gasteiz/Vitoria.

  163. Adela Mesa, Professor of Political Sciences and Administration, Department of
    Political Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Communication, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Leioa.

  164. Vilma Sanz, Professor of History, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), La
    Plata, Argentina.

  165. Javier Íñígo y Ochoa de Chinchetru, Professor of Industrial Engineering,
    Department of Physics, University School of Engineering of Gasteiz/Vitoria, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  166. Eneko Agirre, Professor at the Computing Science Faculty, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  167. Aitor Payros, Professor at the Department of Stratigraphy and Paleontology,
    Faculty of Science and Technology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the
    Basque Country.

  168. Arturo Apraiz, Professor of Geodynamics, Department of Geodynamics /
    Geodinamika Saila, Faculty of Science and Technology, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  169. Jesus M. Txurruka, Associate Professor Department of Genetics, Physical
    Anthropology and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Euskal
    Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country.

  170. Luis Javier Rodríguez Barron, Nutritional Technology / Elikagaien Tecnología,
    Faculty of Pharmacy / Farmazia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country.

  171. Aitzol Zuloaga Izaguirre, Professor at the Department of Electronics &
    Telecommunication, School of Engineering of Bilbo / Bilboko Ingeniaritza Goi
    Eskola Teknikoa, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country,
    Bilbo.

  172. Joxerra Aihartza, Professor at the Department of Zoology and Animal Cell
    Biology, Faculty of Science & Technology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea /
    University of the Basque Country.

  173. Olatz Garcia Zabalbeitia, Professor of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics,
    School of Engineering, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country, Bilbo.

  174. Bertol Arrieta Kortajarena, Professor of Computing Systems and Languages,
    Faculty of Computing, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque
    Country, Donostia/San Sebastián.

  175. Igor Peñalva Bengoa, Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Department of Nuclear
    Engineering / Ingeniaritza Nuklearra eta Jariakinen Mekanika Saila, School of
    Engineering of Bilbo / Bilboko Ingeniaritza Goi Eskola Teknikoa, Euskal Herriko
    Unibertsitatea / University of the Basque Country, Bilbo.

  176. Maider Arizmendiarreta Astarloa, Professor at the Department of Stomatology,
    Faculty of Medicine & Odontology, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / University of the
    Basque Country.

  177. Martxelo Otamendi, Berria egunkariko zuzendari / Director of Berria Newspaper,
    Martin Ugalde Kultur Parkea, Andoain, Gipuzkoa.

  178. Michael J. Bidart, Trial Lawyer, Claremont, California.

  179. Xabier Irujo, Professor of Contemporary History of the Basque Country, Center
    for Basque Studies, University of Nevada, Reno.

  180. Pete Cenarrusa, Former Secretary of State of Idaho (1967-2003), Boise, Idaho.


Edorta Arana
2007-11-21 : 14:27

Hau da Keith Johnsoni azaroaren 9an bidali nio eskaera-mezua:



Dear Mr. Johnson:

I would like ask you for permission to use your article "Basque Inquisition: How Do You Say Shepherd in Euskera" in my classroom at the University of the Basque Country.

It is a good example of lack of balance and neutrality in the use of the information. It is aswell a clear case of the linking of stereotypes and false and biased perceptions of reality.



I hope our students will learn the difference between true and false and try not to write in such a poisoning way. I wish you the same.



Best wishes,



Edorta Arana





iPtx | irratia.com
2007-11-21 : 15:09

Zuzenean ari gara zabaldu.com gunean ere. Ikusgarria da, interesantea oso zelan jendeak aportatzen duen, kezka agertu, mugitu...


sustatu.com, zabaldu.com, irratia.com ... denak balio du. Blogosfera aktiboa, euskararen alde horrenbeste batzar eta subentzio eskatu barik be, ematen du ari garela zerbaitetan.


Harro egoteko moduko Internet_zaleak ditugu Euskal Herrian eta munduan. Biba zuek!


Edu Lartzanguren
2007-11-21 : 17:14

WSJren artikuluak eragindako ika-mikaz erreportaia argitaratu dut Eurolang berri agentzian. Bruselan du egoitza Eurolangek, eta minorizaturiko hizkuntzen inguruko informazioa lantzen du.



Artikuluak ez dio ekarpen handirik egingo afera jarraitu duen euskaldunari. Izan ere, eta atrebentzia ez bada, gertaturikoa ez-euskaldunei azaltzea du helburu.



Irakurtzeko:



http://www.eurolang.com



Permalink:



http://www.eurolang.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2988&Itemid=1&lang=es

Sustatu.eus
2007-11-21 : 17:17

Basque uproar over Wall Street Journal article





Donostia, Tuesday, 20 November 2007 by Edu Lartzanguren

The Basque language, Euskara, is a primitive, backwards, useless language that nobody wants to learn, but is being imposed on a suffering population by evil nationalists entrenched in power in the Basque Country. This is the thrust of the message that one of America's most influential newspapers, The Wall Street Journal, has conveyed to its readers in an article published last week. The report has created an uproar in the Basque Country with writers, academics, journalists and the Basque Government writing in protest to the newspaper.



Critics have described the article as a compendium of derogatory literature that has all the elements of a classic piece of 18th or 19th century racist and imperialist diatribe against any of the world’s lesser used languages. The journalist responsible for the article has denied the accusation that the hand of Spain's former premier Jose Maria Aznar is behind the text.



“Basque Inquisition: How Do You Say Shepherd in Euskera?” is the original title of the article. Then “Through Fiat, Separatists Bring Old Tongue to Life”. It was published on the front page of the Journal's November 6th edition and written by the Madrid correspondent Keith Johnson.



The title refers to a statement by the journalist about Euskara being “an ancient language little suited to contemporary life”. As an example of that, Johnson writes that Euskara has taken many loan-words with Latin or Greek roots “demokrazia, gobernu, independentzia”, while he credits it with having “ten different words for shepherd, depending on the kind of animal”.



The journalist made several discriminatory comparisons and criticised the Basque Government for spending money on the promotion of the language, such as: “Basque separatists have been waging a struggle for independence from Spain for 39 years. But lately, many have taken to wielding grammar instead of guns”.



He criticised the situation where the remaining Spanish monolingual teachers are obliged to learn Euskara by giving them a year off with pay to attend classes. That policy, according to the journalist, causes a shortage of doctors in hospitals and police on the streets,



Three political commentators are quoted in the article. Two of them belong to the right wing PP, known for its anti Basque language views, and who neither speak nor understand Basque. The third is an ex-member of the Basque Government who has who has Spanish nationalist views.



Johnson also lashed out at the Basque public television channel (EiTB) “which broadcasts in Euskara” over the “difficulty of finding quality shows” on it, and compares it with “the animal-documentary channel” on Spanish TV.



Basque reaction



“Saying that we have no specialists because we demand Basque is false and a total insult to our intelligence”, wrote Katixa Agirre, a young university teacher, in her response to the article on her blog. The article has raised a storm of answers in Basque internet and media. Agirre pointed out that those that complain about the need for Basque-speaking public workers “would be happier if it [Euskara] only were spoken among shepherds or inside one’s home”. Agirre invited Johnson to have a look at all the doctoral theses that are written in the Basque language every year”.



A Welsh speaker, Rhys Wynne, answered her: “I shall be using your arguments in future when similar false claims are made against my langage”.



Michael Morris, the author of the leading English-Basque dictionary and native speaker of English, wrote that it is wholly inaccurate to say that a language such as Basque is little suited to modern life. “Every bona fide linguist knows that any language can express any idea, especially when language planning has taken place”, wrote Morris in a letter addressed to Johnson.



Basque language planning targeted



“Basque language planning is the main target of the article” said Patxi Baztarrika, vice-secretary for language development in the Basque Government, on public radio on Thursday. Baztarrika pointed out that the Basque Government is not trying to “impose” Euskara, instead he said that it is trying to “normalise its use to reach a real social equality” between the Basque and Spanish languages. “In the modern world linguistic plurality is the norm and monolingualism the exception”, he added.



“What Johnson has written is a classic”, said writer and commentator Joan Mari Torrealdai to Eurolang. In 1998 he published a book in Spanish entitled ‘El libro negro del Euskara’ (The Black Book of Euskara), in which he gathered quotes from basquephobes through history. “We are used to reading such things in the Spanish press. The main thesis is well-known: Euskara is not a modern language and has no social value. Now, a third one has been added since Aznar's time: Euskara is being imposed.”



Keith Johnson has not answered any of the e-mails sent by the author, but addressed a general answer to all those that had written to him about his article. “I never set out to denigrate Euskera, and regret any offense it may have caused to Basque speakers”, he wrote. He has been living in Madrid for ten years and has been the Wall Street Journal’s correspondent there since 1999. He has been praised before in Spain's right-wing press for being tough on Basque issues. He took no responsibility for the use of the word “Inquisition” in the headline of the article, saying that in U.S. newspapers journalists don’t write their own headlines.



An Aznar connection?



“Why this article, why in that newspaper, why now?” asks Torrealdai, adding that it is obvious that a “black hand” is behind it.



The newspaper, founded in 1889, was bought by media tycoon Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation on August 1, 2007. A year before, Jose Maria Aznar, Spain's former chief of government, and personal friend of Murdoch had become News Corp.'s 14th board member and its first non-native English speaker. Mr Aznar's Popular Party lost the elections in 2004 after having tried in vain to convince Spaniards, and the world, that the authors of the March 11th bomb massacre in Madrid were Basque rather than Al Qaeda members, as it was later proved.



The link between the Wall Street Journal and Aznar has been pointed out by many in the last days. “The connection is there”, said Patxi Baztarrika. He stressed the fact that only one political party - Aznar's - gives its opinion in the article.



Keith Johnson has denied any connection with Aznar. “Whatever errors there are in the article are mine; there is never any interference from above at any time, and certainly not when the editorial independence of the newspaper has been the key concern during the whole takeover process”.



The newspaper seems to have taken notice of the uproar caused by the article, and from midweek on the headline of the article in its website archives appeared more neutral, even positive, such as “Basques bring old tongue to life”. However, the rest of the article remains basically unchanged except for some Basque words derived from “herder” that Johnson translated wrongly.



Today, 180 Basque intellectuals and politicians, including some Americans, have signed a letter to the Wall Street Journal. They say that Basque is a growing language used in all realms of public and private life, not only in the Basque Country but in places such as Boise, Idaho and California, where sizeable Basque communities live. Signatories include the writer Bernardo Atxaga and Pete Cenarrusa, former Secretary of State from Idaho. They demand that the Wall Street Journal correct the article by Keith Johnson and to publish that correction on their front page. (Eurolang 2007)



Link to the WSJ article and some answers (subscription):



http://online.wsj.com/public/search/page/3_0466.html?KEYWORDS=basque&imageField.x=0&imageField.y=0



Link to the article (free):



http://www.sustatu.com/1194969965



Link to two of the responses:



http://www.eitb24.com/new/en/B24_74243/life/ANSWER-TO-AN-ARTICLE-Expert-answers-article-Wall-Street/



http://www.blogak.com/katixa/as-a-response-to-the-wsj-article

Sustatu
2007-12-20 : 16:47

Atzo, abenduak 19, HPSko buru Patxi Baztarrikaren erantzun gutuna argitaratu zuen The Wall Street Journalek. Sarean, ordainpeko artxiboan dago testua, baina hona bere edukia osorik:



For the Love of Basque . . . and Spanish



If insult is the lowest form of language, then one would have to delve deep into the English dictionary in order to find a suitable term to describe the article Basque Inquisition: How Do You Say Shepherd in Euskera?.



The two main pillars upon which the language policy pursued by the Basque institutions has always rested are the current legal framework and social adherence, never imposition. The policy is open, democratic and respectful of the Spanish tongue.



Obviously, language policy is open to debate, which is only logical in a social process spanning 25 years. According to the Spanish Constitution, the Statute of Autonomy of the Basque Country and the Constitutional Court, Basque citizens have the right to use any of the two official languages — Basque and Spanish — and the public authorities must determine what public jobs have to be bilingual in order to ensure this right.



So for the last 25 years, the Basque institutions have spearheaded a process that has put Euskera firmly on the path toward normalization, because we believe that the aim of any language policy should be the normalization and peaceful, amicable coexistence between languages. The vast majority of Basques aspire to real and effective bilingualism, to a true state of equal opportunities for use. We aspire to ensuring that those who wish to conduct their lives in the Basque tongue may do so freely and without hindrance.



We aren’t advocates of monolingualism, either Basque or Spanish, and you will never find us defending ideas based on imposition or exclusion. We aren’t working against anyone or anything because we love and respect the Spanish language, which is also the language of Euskadi. We are working in favor of a bilingualism that considers both Euskera and Spanish to be part of our common heritage. The development of these languages is a task that involves us all, which means that, in light of the current imbalance, we require an active, positive policy of support for the minority, lesser-used language. We require a policy that is designed and enforced on the basis of a deep respect for Spanish, as well as a firm conviction that bilingualism has an intrinsic value in itself and that peaceful, amicable coexistence between languages is an asset that will contribute to enhancing the cohesion of Basque society.



Patxi Baztarrika Galparsoro

Deputy Minister for Language Policy

The Basque Government

Bilbao, Spain

Erantzun

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